A wonderful person and member of my church, Delya Stoltz is a paramedic who works in a community ambulance service responding to 911 phone calls.  On December 6, following days of demonstrations against police violence in Berkeley and Oakland (major cities north of Fremont), she decided to put fingers to keyboard and composed and posted the following musings on Facebook.

I asked her for permission to post these thoughts here so that a wider audience could consider her opinions and her experience.  I don’t necessarily agree everything here, but I have read about neither similar thoughts nor similar experiences online elsewhere, so I want to share them to be included in other things you read about this moment in our history.

– Jeff Spencer

MY THOUGHTS ON LAW ENFORCEMENT STRIFE (shaped by my employment as a 911 medic):

Delya Stoltz at work.

Delya Stoltz at work.

This short essay is some stuff that has been rattling in my head during every charged post that I didn’t reply to recently (for fear of saying things in a manner that would engender more conflict). I’m really lucky that my Friends’ List runs from extremes at both ends of the political spectrum. It’s usually my Conservative friends that ‘challenge’ me the most. (Or would that be ‘harass’?  ) And while I do tend to be at the Liberal end of most political divides, a good portion of my online social contacts are quite a bit ‘left’ of where even I land. Overall, these wonderful and spirited people (from all sides) that often disagree with me can make my computer log-ins ‘interesting’ and sometimes improve my understanding of the world.

In my right-ward leaning chums, I have noticed the tendency to underestimate the continued difficulty of being dark-complected, poor, or just ‘different’ in America. Simply because we are legally equal, doesn’t mean that everyday citizens get a fair shake in the practice of reality. And there are some groups that still do not enjoy equal legal privileges. As a white hetero-normative appearing person who speaks in a manner local to the area in which I live, I will not even try to understand the daily trials that many others encounter during activities that are experienced as routine to me.

One thing that I’ve noticed among some of the left-ward leaning is that police officers are increasingly a ‘them’ group that are, at times, unfairly generalized. I’m not an apologist for overly aggressive police officers, and I’m not saying that there aren’t departments with a toxic culture. We all know that there are bad officers, and we also know that there are good officers who make mistakes. I do admit that the results of irresponsible policing exact much higher tolls than poor job performance in other fields. Most professions do not hold the actual power to end a life based on the perception of a situation, or a workplace mistake.

With all of that said, there is a good chance that I am still wandering around and posting on your FB feed because of responsible and ethical police work. It’s not necessarily one particular incident that I am thinking of, but over nine years of rendering 911 services to compromised people in unsafe environments. The number of methamphetamine addled encounters are far too many to count, as are the gang members, angry relatives, aggressive psychiatric patients, and crime suspects. It’s not that I’ve ever been at gun point and had an officer bravely jump in and save the day, as in a movie. What it is like is my unit being ‘cleared’ into a situation after it’s been stabilized by law. I’ve had to retreat from a 911 call (that was not dispatched with police based on its initial characterization by the reporting party) and wait until it was safe to reenter. And I’ve also been escorted into unsafe environments by law enforcement. As an example, I can tell you from experience that going late at night to a shooting inside a large rodeo event with a single rural Sheriff is an intimidating experience. Imagine being screamed at with pejorative terms as you are pulling a bloody person from a pick-up truck bed, because your care was not delivered quickly enough to suit the tastes of the angry and drunk family members. For every one police officer who drew when he or she shouldn’t have, there are so many more like that sheriff, who deescalated the upset family and helped lift the bloody person through the intoxicated crowd and into my ambulance.

I hope that everybody remembers that there is no true ‘THEM.’ Everybody is somebody else’s son or daughter. Whether your uniform is blue and sports a badge, whether you are some form of more tan than pale, or whether you carry an accent in the place that you live or travel to; you deserve to be judged on the merits of your own deeds.

I would also ask you to consider that when you or your friends make really valid concerns clear in protest settings, that infrastructure be protected. And infrastructure includes streets and freeways. Impeding their usage is a dangerous thing to do. Roads are the passageways that deliver ambulances and fire trucks as well as cop cars and ordinary people. Regardless of how you feel about police cruisers and the officers that they contain, they can assist in the delivery of those of us who can help an asthmatic child, put out a fire, or help at a vehicle accident. My friends who work in dispatch had to reroute ambulances performing transfers on the night that the Interstate 580 was shut down for a while. There is a children’s hospital and a trauma center in Oakland. I don’t know that anybody was kept from either facility, but such an occurrence could be a consequence of protests that close important roadways. Dispatchers are a notoriously quick thinking group, so I am sure that all went well. It just had the potential to not go well.

It’s just that I have a family of first responders that I hate to hear derided. They are male and female, they are of all different orientations and colors. The vast majority of them want to protect you, and would do so at the potential cost of their own lives.

Copyright (c) 2014 by Delya Stoltz; used by permission.

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