Holy Jesus, who calls us to rise with you, renew us. Reveal your strength in our weakness. Let us fall into you that we may rise with you.

For those who suffer from ill health, we offer this prayer of healing that they, too, may rise.

For those who live in harms way – be the harm from disaster or violence – we offer this prayer of safety that they, too, may rise.

For those who are in grief, we offer this prayer of comfort that they, too, may rise.

For those who are unemployed and underemployed, we offer this prayer of support that they, too, may rise.

For those who are weary and heavy laden, we offer this prayer of hope that they, too, may rise.

May we reach out in your strength to those who are in need. May our hands and our words and our caring empower our neighbors.

And on this mothers day …

For those who rejoice in the love of their mothers, we offer this prayer of thanks.

For those who grieve in the deaths of their mothers, we offer this prayer of comfort.

For those who are wounded still in the brokenness of relationships with their mothers, we offer this prayer of healing.

For those who do not know their mothers, we offer this prayer of support.

For those who live in fear of their mothers, we offer this prayer of safety.

And, Jesus, are you not also a mother?[i]

Are you not like a mother hen gathering her chicks under her wings?

Truly, Jesus, you are a mother, for all those in labor and all who are born are eagerly welcomed into your gentle arms.

So we run underneath the feathers of you, Jesus, our mother.

And ask you, Jesus, the great mother, that in your sweet mercy, our wounds may be healed, and in that comfort, we may rise again.

Christ, my mother, you still gather all of your children in.

So, now we place ourselves underneath those wings.

So now I place myself underneath your wings.

Amen.

[i] From this line to the end of the prayer: adapted from Christopher Grundy, “St. Anselm’s Prayer: Are You Not Also A Mother?” a prayer/song by Christopher Grundy based on a prayer by St. Anselm of Canterbury, circa 1100. As Christopher put is, “Lyrics by St. Anselm, translated by Sr. Benedicta Ward, adapted by Christopher Grundy. Lyrics published on Facebook on 5 May 2016, https://www.facebook.com/christophergrundymusic/posts/10153613149583225.
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